30 December 2008

Spanish-American War Resources

In her article "New Mexicans in the Spanish - American War: Part Two", (New Mexico Genealogist: December 2008) Mary Penner discusses a number of resources that researchers can use to write family histories about their ancestors who fought in the the Spanish-American War. The article goes into great detail; only a few will be mentioned here.

* Compiled Military Service Records (CMSR) - these records may be found at the National Archives. Use this link to order these records. Digitized Carded Records of 1,235 men who served in the Rough Riders may be found at the website at this link.

* Records of the Rough Riders Association may be found at the Las Vegas Museum. A finding aid for the Rough Riders Memorial Collection may be found at this link.

* Photos of soldiers may be found at the University of New Mexico's digital collection and the Library of Congress.

* WorldCat in an online card catalogue of collections around the world. Click on this link for more information.

Of course, you may use these resources to research other types of information. For instance, the National Archives has military records for all American wars as well as other documents of interest to genealogists.

For more about Mary Penner, check out her website at http://www.marypenner.com/.


Read other great articles in the New Mexico Genealogist. You can get a subscription to this journal by becoming a member of the New Mexico Genealogical Society. Yet another good reason to become a member.

26 December 2008

Explanation: Blog Post about Senator Salazar

To the NMGS Blog readers:

Since I have received correspondences about my post "Obama Pick Claims New Mexico Ties", I wanted to make a few things clear. I was not meaning to be disrespectful in any way towards United States Senator Ken Salazar's claim that he can trace his lineage back to 1598 New Mexico. The point of the post was to inform my readers about Senator Salazar's claim. However, being a responsible genealogist, I wished to point out that his claim has not been verified, at least to my knowledge. In order to clarify what I meant, I wish to make a few more arguments

1.) When Senator Salazar made the claim at a press conference, he did not have the time or resources to support his claim. The purpose of the press conference was to announce his appointment and to give a little bit of biographical information about himself. It wasn't a genealogical presentation and wasn't meant to be.

2.) There may be research out there that shows that Senator Salazar can trace his lineage back to 1598 New Mexico. He, or someone else, may have published an article or book showing proof of this lineage. The fact is, I personally don't know of any such research. Therefore, I wasn't going to say that his claim is supported by facts. It may be, it may not be, the fact is, I don't know so I won't say that it is true.

3.) I noted that saying that his roots going back to 1598 Santa Fe is not true. Santa Fe was not founded until 1610. Settlers were living in Santa Fe prior to 1610, but Santa Fe was not the first settlement in New Mexico. There were settlers in New Mexico in 1598, but not in Santa Fe.

4.) I noted that Fray Angelico Chavez's book "Origins of New Mexico Families" claims that the first Salazar that came to New Mexico shows up in records in 1625. I understand that there is other research out there, and there may be others who found Salazars who were in New Mexico in 1598. I used this reference to Chavez's book because the book is well known by New Mexican researchers.

5.) I also mentioned that Senator Salazar could be refering to another line in his genealogy, other than the one following his Salazar surname. There were plenty of other Spaniards who were in New Mexico in 1598 that he could have, and probably is, descended from.

6.) I wish to quote a paragraph from my previous blog post:



It would be interesting to find out more about Senator Salazar's family. Of course, until proof is offered, his claim is unverified. However, it is not unlikely that he does have New Mexico roots going back a number of centuries.



I was not saying that I did not believe that Salazar had roots going back to 1598. I was simply saying that I personally did not have proof. That's it; that's all.

Robert Baca
President, New Mexico Genealogical Society


P.S.: "Joe" wanted me to share this picture of Senator Ken Salazar that was taken at an Obama rally. I believe that Joe took it himself. Since the election is already over, I hope no one thinks that I'm trying to support a certain political view, party or candidate. This is simply a photo that I'm sharing with you that one of our readers shared with us. And it's a good visual for this post.


United States Senator Ken Salazar

24 December 2008

Obama Pick Claims New Mexico Family Ties

President-Elect Barack Obama's nominee for Interior Secretary claims a New Mexican genealogy going back to the late 16th Century. Colorado's United States Senator Ken Salazar announced during his presentation earlier this month, that his family has been in what is now the Western United States for more than four centuries. He claims that he can trace his lineage back to late 1500s Santa Fe. Of course, Santa Fe has only been around since the early 1600s, but we get the picture.

If he is claiming his lineage through his Salazar surname, his family may have not arrived in New Mexico until 1625 or later. In his book "Origins of New Mexico Families", Fray Angelico Chavez notes that a Francisco de Salazar appears in records as a soldier-escort at that time. Of course, Senator Salazar may have been refering to another line in his genealogy.

Another source, Congresspedia, claims that Salazar can trace his lineage back to 12th Century Spain.

Senator Ken Salazar has an older brother who is also in the United States Congress, Representative John T. Salazar. The elder Salazar brother had been vetted for Agricultural Secretary, but was not appointed to the post.

It would be interesting to find out more about Senator Salazar's family. Of course, until proof is offered, his claim is unverified. However, it is not unlikely that he does have New Mexico roots going back a number of centuries.

Click on this link to read the story about Senator Salazar's appointment.

Chavez's "Origin of New Mexico Families" and other books of New Mexico history and genealogy can be found on the New Mexico Genealogical Society link to Amazon.com. Using this link allows for a portion of your payment for books and other items to go to the New Mexico Genealogical Society, which we use to help out the Albuquerque Special Collections Library. Please use this link whenever your are on Amazon.com.

By the way, books published by the New Mexico Genealogical Society may be found on our website at this link.

23 December 2008

NMGS 2009 Membership

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

It's that time of the year to renew your membership, or start a membership, with the New Mexico Genealogical Society! A $25 membership gets you the following:

* Four issues of the New Mexico Genealogist, the quarterly journal for New Mexico genealogy. This includes our special "Aqui Se Comienza" March 2009 issue, in which genealogists expand our knowledge of the founding families of Alburquerque, as detailed in the popular NMGS book of the same name.

* FREE shipping on orders from NMGS Press .

* Confer with others who understand your interest (obsession?) in genealogy.

* And so much more....

If you are already a member, check your December 2008 issue of the New Mexico Genealogist for an Application for Membership. You should receive the issue soon.

If you are not already a member, click on this link, and print up a copy of the application. The first issue of the year is sent out in March 2009.

Thank you, and have a safe holiday!

Robert J. C. Baca
President, New Mexico Genealogical Society

21 November 2008

Native American Genealogical Resources for New Mexico

Native American Genealogical Resources for New Mexico

By Karen Stein Daniel, CGSM

Patterned after the 3rd edition of Genealogical Resources for New Mexico, this new resource guide is for genealogical and family history researchers of New Mexico Apache, Navajo, Pueblo, and Ute families.

The guide is extensively researched with annotated bibliographies. It includes chapters on archives, libraries, and museums, church resources, Federal Government resources, Family History Library microfilm, internet resources, vital record resources, and additional resources.

Information is also included for members of these tribes who may have lived, at least part of the time, in Arizona, Colorado, or Utah.

The book is indexed and contains 255 pages, keys to using the guide, a list of terms, and a discussion of the Genealogical Proof Standard.

About the author: NMGS member Karen Stein Daniel is a certified genealogist and a former editor of the New Mexico Genealogist. She is author of several books for the New Mexico Genealogical Society, including two editions of Genealogical Resources for New Mexico, New Mexico Mining Fatalities and Accidents, and Naturalization Records by New Mexico Courts.

Click here for an order form, or return to NMGS Press for a full list of books by NMGS Press. This is Book E-14.

20 November 2008

Retirement Party for Joe Sabatini, Special Collection Librarian

The notice below was sent to me by the librarians at the Albuquerque Special Collections Library. They asked me to share the information. Joe Sabatini is an fantastic librarian in an excellent library. NMGS will miss him. (By the way, he'll be speaking at our January program.)
Joe Sabatini
is Retiring!
Please Join Us to Celebrate
Joe’s 35 years with the
Albuquerque/Bernalillo
County Library System.

When: Thursday, December 4 , 2008
Time: 3:00 -5:00 P.M.
Where: Special Collections Library

423 Central NE
( Central & Edith)

17 November 2008

John Kessell Book Signing

The following was sent to us by Bookworks, an Albuquerque bookstore.

November 23,2008 at 3pm at Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande in the Flying Star Plaza

For more than four hundred years in New Mexico, Pueblo Indians and Spaniards have lived “together yet apart.” Now the preeminent historian of that region’s colonial past offers a fresh, balanced look at the origins of a precarious relationship.

John L. Kessell’s Pueblos,Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexico is the first narrative history devoted to the tumultuous seventeenth century in New Mexico. Kessell clearly describes the Pueblo world encountered by Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate and portrays important but lesser-known Indian partisans, while weaving analysis and interpretation into the flow of life in 17th century New Mexico.

04 November 2008

Limited Release: The Life of Rafael Chacon

The advertisement below is meant for informational purposes only, and is not an official endorsement by the New Mexico Genealogical Society.

Limited Release

Legacy of Honor
The Life of
Rafael Chacon,
A Nineteenth-Century
New Mexican


Edited by
Jacqueline Dorgan Meketa


The family of Jacqueline Meketa is releasing a limited quantity of the University of New Mexico Press, first edition of this book, from the Meketa’s private collection. These are brand new, never been read cloth-bound copies.
ISBN 0-8263-0886-4

“It was my Mother’s explicit wish that her books be in the hands of those that would appreciate them most. Her undying love of the history of the New Mexico Territory and the people of the times defined who she was. Her wish was to immortalize the common man and woman and the trials and events of their lives in such a way as to enrich our lives today.”
~Rebecca Meketa Lovesee~

Copies may be acquired for $80.00 and are limited to 2 per person and include a photo of Jacqueline and
her husband, historian Charles Meketa.

Contact: Rebecca Lovesee, 3713 Camino Sacramento NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (505) 323-4923

24 October 2008

Crypto Jews in New Mexico and Colorado?

I received an e-mail from a NMGS member who pointed me to a Smithsonian Magazine article about possible crypto-Jews in Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado. I don't wish to enter the debate as to whether there are crypto-Jews living in the area today, but I do want to emphasize this article. It's a good one that give both sides of the issue.

The story discusses genetics and disease, as well as the possibility that descendants of crypto-Jews still do Jewish rituals today.

Click on this link, "The 'Secret Jews' of San Luis Valley" by Jeff Wheelwright.

18 October 2008

November 2008 NMGS Program

Saturday, November 15, 2008, 10:30 AM

Botts Hall, Albuquerque Special Collections Library

423 Central NE, Albuquerque NM

(NW Corner of Edith and Central)

The
New Mexico Genealogical Society
presents

Ramona Caplan


 

speaking about


 

Cathay Williams,

Buffalo Soldier

Her True Story into the 20th Century


 

This is the unique story of an African-American woman, born into slavery, who became a soldier in the United States Army. In the years after the Civil War, and well into the 20th Century, women were not allowed to join the military. She, like a few other women in history, disguised herself as a man in order to serve her country. She was the only documented female member of the Buffalo Soldiers.

Her story is intertwined within the history of post Civil War New Mexico. As such, Cathay Williams will represent Luna County in the New Mexico Historical Marker Initiative, a program that recognizes women who impacted the history of our state. Please join us in celebrating this remarkable woman.


 

This program is free and open to the public.

For more information about our programs, please visit the New Mexico Genealogical Society website at http://www.nmgs.org/workshop.htm

13 October 2008

NMGS Program, This Saturday: “New Mexico’s New Deal”





This Saturday, October 18, 2008, 10:30 AM

Botts Hall, Albuquerque Special Collections Library

423 Central NE, Albuquerque NM

(NW Corner of Edith and Central)


The
New Mexico Genealogical Society
presents


Historian David Kammer, Ph.D.


discussing


"New Mexico's New Deal:


A 75th Anniversary Perspective"


>


President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal left an indelible mark on New Mexico's public architecture and landscape. Through programs such as the WPA. PWA and CCC, the unemployed obtained work relief and left New Mexico with a legacy that includes courthouses, town halls, community centers, public art and parks.

This illustrated talk will explore how the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression affected the state and the New Deal's efforts to stimulate the state's economy through thousands of public works projects that extended to every community in New Mexico. The talk will also focus on New Mexico's New Deal governor, Clyde Tingley, and the ways that the New Deal transformed not only the state's built environment but the role of state government as well.

In recognizing the 75th Anniversary of the New Deal, the talk will offer an array of examples showing how these public works projects remain a part of our state's heritage.


This program is free and open to the public.


This program is made possible by the New Mexico Humanities Council through grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the New Mexico Office of Cultural Affairs.

04 October 2008

Inquiry: Photos of the Kavanaugh Family

The pictures below were sent to me by Rebekah Sanchez. They are of people that she hasn't been able to recognize. If you know who these people are, please send me a message at abqbobcat@nmia.com or post a comment to this blog.

The words that follow are Rebekah's descriptions of the photos:

I'm told that the Kavanaugh family photo was taken around 1915, and I think that's about right because the children in front were born in 1909 & 1910. They look like they are 4 & 5ish. From the left, there is Felix Kavanaugh, Rufino Kavanaugh (with hands in pocket), Nicolas Kavanaugh. Then there are the mystery ladies. I'm told that these ladies are Lucia & Julia Kavanaugh (Juan F. Kavanaugh's daughters), Henrietta Delgado Kavanaugh (Nicolas Kavanaugh's wife), & Rupertita Kavanaugh(Juan D. Kavanaugh's daughter). However, depending on who I talk to any of the four ladies in the picture could be any of the 4 named. Still in the back is Juan F. Kavanaugh, another of his sons Juan D. Kavanaugh, and Abraham Kavanaugh. Then the second row, the two on the left are two of the mystery ladies, then Melecia C. de Baca Kavanaugh & Margarita Salazar Kavanaugh. In front are the children of Juan D. Kavanaugh & Margarita Salazar: Ignacio Enrique Kavanaugh (b. 1910) & Mary Kavanaugh (b. 1909). Does anyone know for sure which lady is which? Lucia was born in 1893 and Julia in 1895. Henrietta Delgado Kavanaugh born ca. 1894 and Rupertita Kavanaugh in 1904.

Personally, I think that the lady directly to the right of Rufino looks like a little girl, and would be Rupertita. At the reunion, Julia and Lucia's descendants claim it's Julia or Lucia, and that she looks like an adult.



Then there is the very old Kavanaugh picture. At the bottom it is labeled 'Kavanaugh family.' My cousin Tita K. Lopez has his picture, and does not recoginize anyone in the photo (neither do I). This photo appears to be taken at the same house as the 1915 photo. Maybe the guy in the photo to the left of the doorway is Juan F. Kavanaugh? Some of the little kids may be his (Felix, Rufino, Lucia, Julia, Juan D. & Abraham), but who are the others? He had a brother and a sister in Las Vegas, Luis Gold (m. Juanita Garcia), and Carlota Gold de Sedillos (m. Luis Sedillos). Juan F. Kavanaugh had a sister Maria Kavanaugh Bustamante (m. Andres Bustamante) who lived in Santa Fe in 1880, and was in Gallup by 1900. Is it the Kavanaugh and Gold, Sedillo, or Bustamante family? Maybe it's his family and his step-dad's family the Coriz? His mom Refugio Aguilar married Filomeno Coriz, and he had several children from his first marriage.


The last picture is of Felix Kavanaugh (center) and ?. Probably taken in Las Vegas.



Rebekah says: "If your gang of bloggers could help me identify the folks in the pictures, that would be wonderful."

27 September 2008

Correction: New Mexico Digital History Project

On page 117 of the September New Mexico Genealogist, we posted an web address for the Office of the State Historian. As we mentioned in our article, the website is a great place to "...check out documents and maps of the past(,) (r)esearch land grants(,) (and) (e)xplore family genealogy...."

We inadvertently mispelled the web address for that site. It should read:

http://www.newmexicohistory.org

Please pass along this information.

21 September 2008

NMGS Visits Las Vegas, New Mexico

A building is a terrible thing to waste.

On September 20th, the New Mexico Genealogical Society visited the Committee for Historical Preservation in Las Vegas, New Mexico. This organization helps preserve historic buildings in the area and collects local history and genealogy.

The Plaza Hotel, Las Vegas, New Mexico


Pat Patrick gave a talk about Las Vegas' history. He is a volunteer for the CCHP. Twenty-two people attended his presentation. Audience members were from both Albuquerque and Las Vegas.

Pat Patrick speaking


Afterwards, Pat gave us a tour of old town in which he told us about history of many of the buildings on the plaza.

Pat Patrick pointing at the Plaza Hotel


If you would like to view more photos about our visit, please visit my Facebook photo page at this link.

20 September 2008

October 2008 NMGS Program

Saturday, October 18, 2008, 10:30 AM
Botts Hall, Albuquerque Special Collections Library
423 Central Ave. NE, Albuquerque, NM (NW Corner of Edith and Central)

The New Mexico Genealogical Society presents

David Kammer
Speaking about

“New Mexico’s New Deal:
A 75th Anniversary Perspective”


President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal left an indelible mark on New Mexico's public architecture and landscape. Through programs such as the WPA. PWA and CCC, the unemployed obtained work relief and left New Mexico with a legacy that includes courthouses, town halls, community centers, public art and parks.

In recognizing the 75th Anniversary of the New Deal, the talk will offer an array of examples showing how these public works projects remain a part of our state's heritage.

This program is free and open to the public.

For more information about our programs, please visit our website at http://www.nmgs.org/workshop.htm.

This program is made possible by the New Mexico Humanities Council through grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the New Mexico Office of Cultural Affairs.

05 September 2008

September 2008 NMGS Program

September 20, 2008
10:30 AM


The New Mexico Genealogical Society
visits

The Citizen's Committee for Historical Preservation
in Las Vegas, New Mexico

A speaker will discuss the history of Las Vegas

There will also be a tour of historic Las Vegas. The cost for the tour is $5 per person.


Come travel with us and help celebrate the history of Las Vegas, New Mexico. The committee's offices hold historic photographs and documents of great interest.


Directions to the Citizen's Committee for Historic Preservation: The offices are located at 116 Bridge St., Las Vegas, New Mexico. From the south, take I-25 to the Las Vegas' first exit (Exit # 345). As you drive into Las Vegas, follow the signs to Old Town Plaza. Once you are at the plaza (which is close by), take the road east which is Bridge Street. You should be able to find it from there.

Map:

Click on the "B" balloon to get directions
.



View Larger Map

02 September 2008

Inquiry: Unclaimed Person Joe Lucero of NM

I just joined a group on Facebook called Unclaimed Persons. Genealogists on this list discuss persons who died and were not claimed by relatives.One such person is Joe Lucero from New Mexico.

Since Joe Lucero is a common name in the area, they are having a hard time finding who he is related to. Here is some information posted by Dra Ana Oquendo-Pabon:

From Hillsborough County Coroner:

Joe Lucero
Born: 02-22-1936 Santa Fe, NM
Died: 05-01-1989 Tampa, FL
White
Likely residences:
???
Likely locations of family:
New Mexico & Florida


There is more information on the discussion list. One of the things that they want someone to do is to check the baptismal microfilm for Santa Fe. I am not able to do that immediately, so if you would like to help please do so. For more information, check out the discussion list "Case # 19 - Joe Lucero - New Mexico to Florida" at this link.

If you wish to post on the list, you will need to join Facebook. Otherwise, just send me an e-mail at abqbobcat@nmia.com, and I'll be happy to post your information there.

13 August 2008

New books for NM Research

(For a peek at the cover, see http://www.nmgs.org/SANM_reprint.htm).


SPANISH ARCHIVES OF NEW MEXICO RELEASED IN NEW EDITIONS BY SUNSTONE PRESS CELEBRATING STATE'S UPCOMING CENTENNIAL

Santa Fe, NM - In 1914, Ralph Emerson Twitchell published in two volumes The Spanish Archives of New Mexico, the first calendar and guide to the documents from the Spanish colonial periods. These geographic, political and cultural mappings have served scholars, policy-makers, and activists for generations and are now once again available from Sunstone Press in its Southwest Heritage Series, devoted to the celebration of New Mexico's upcoming Centennial.

Published in both hardcover and softcover editions, the pair has a new foreword by State Historian Estevan Rael-Gálvez. In his foreword, Rael-Gálvez refers to these volumes as "the doors to a house of words and stories," some 4,481 documents, "that open to a time of
kings and popes, of inquisition and revolution. Like any house, New Mexico's archive has a tale of its own origin and a complex history. Although its walls have changed many times, its doors and the encounters with those doors hold stories known and told and others not yet revealed."

Many of these documents were given a number by Twitchell, small stickers that were appended to the first page of each document, an act of heresy to archivists and yet these stickers have now become part of the artifact. The collection consists of civil land records of the Spanish period governments of New Mexico and materials created by the Surveyor General and Court of Private Land Claims during the process of adjudication. It includes the original Spanish colonial petitions for land grants, land conveyances, wills, mine registers, records books, journals, dockets, reports, minutes, letters, and a variety of other legal documents. The bulk of the records accentuate the amazingly dynamic nature of land grant and settlement policies. While the documents reveal the broad sweep of community settlement and its reverse effect, hundreds of last wills and testaments are included in these records, that are scripted in the most eloquent and spiritual tone at the passing of individuals into death. These testaments also reveal a legacy of what colonists owned and bequeathed to the next generations.

Estevan Rael-Gálvez concludes his foreword by saying: "Let this effort and the key provided by Twitchell in his two volumes open the doors wide for knowledge to be useful today and tomorrow." Sunstone Press hopes the reissue of these significant books will further appreciation for New Mexico's colorful history.

Volume One:
Hardcover, 620 pages, ISBN: 978-0-86534-683-3, $65.00
Softcover, 620 pages, ISBN: 978-0-86534-647-5, $45.00

Volume Two:
Hardcover, 764 pages, ISBN: 978-0-86534-684-0, $65.00
Softcover, 764 pages, ISBN: 978-0-86534-648-2, $45.00

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: CARL CONDIT / (505) 988-4418 OR
orders@sunstonepress.com.

SUNSTONE PRESS
Box 2321
Santa Fe, NM 87504-2321
USA
(505) 988-4418
(505) 988-1025 fax
www.sunstonepress.com

26 July 2008

August 16, 2008 NMGS Program


Saturday, August 16, 2008, 10:30 AM
Botts Hall, Albuquerque Special Collections Library
423 Edith NE, Albuquerque NM (NW Corner of Edith and Central)



The New Mexico Genealogical Society Presents

William Litchman, Ph.D.
Presenting the second part of his workshop


Researching the Courthouse:
Deeds, Wills, Titles and Other Records, Part II


Dr. Litchman presents the second part of a workshop that he began in September 2007. This will be an in-depth exploration of legal records that are essential to genealogical research. He is a thorough researcher and an entertaining speaker. We are happy to welcome him back.

As always, certain books published by NMGS will be on sale during the program.Please visit the NMGS Press web page at http://www.nmgs.org/books.htm for a full listing of NMGS books.


This program is free and open to the public.


For more information about our programs, please visit our website at http://www.nmgs.org/workshop.htm.
the Albuquerque Genealogical Society
and the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Library System
are pleased to sponsor a


Genealogical Seminar

with Dr. George K. Schweitzer
internationally-known genealogist, author, and lecturer

Saturday, August 23, 2008
Albuquerque Main Library Auditorium
10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(Check-in begins at 10 a.m.)

Session Topics: “Tracing Ancestors Back Across the Atlantic”
“German Emigration, Immigration, and Migration Patterns”
“English Genealogical Research”

Cost: $30 for AGS members, $35 for non-members
if registered by August 13
($10 more for registrations after August 13)

Location: The Main Library is located at 501 Copper Ave. NW
(one block north of Central, between 5th & 6th Streets). City parking is
available. Enjoy lunch at a nearby restaurant, or bring a sack lunch.

See the AGS website: http://www.abqgen.swnet.com/

Send check payable to Albuquerque Genealogical Society,
with names of attendees, address, phone, and e-mail address, to
AGS, Seminar, P. O. Box 25512, Albuquerque, NM 87125-5512.
Note: Click on this link to download a copy of this Special Event in PDF Format (.pdf) that also includes a registration form.

20 July 2008

Recap of July 2008 NMGS Program

Yesterday, July 19, 2008, I did a presentation for the New Mexico Genealogical Society titled "Swiss Family Zimmerly: A Socorro, New Mexico Story." The program began at 10:30 A.M. in Botts Hall at the Albuquerque Special Collections Library.

The story was about Samuel Zimmerly, a Civil War soldiers, and his New Mexican wife Maria Paubla Torres. Samuel and Paubla are my 2nd great grandparents.

I began the presentation by talking about my maternal grandmother Maria Paublita Zimmerly, and how her father, Estevan Zimmerly, named her after his mother. I then told the story of Samuel Zimmerly, and how he came to New Mexico as a member of the California Column. I then spoke about his wife Maria Paubla Torres. I traced her ancestors back to Belen, New Mexico, and explained how they arrived in Socorro sometime after 1816. I finished by talking about the hardships that Samuel and Paubla had to endure, how they had a family and ran a milling business, how Samuel died in 1887 only three weeks after the birth of his final child, and how Paubla continued raising and supporting her family into the 20th Century.



Robert Baca, speaking before an audience at Botts Hall



I used a Powerpoint presentation for my speech. The slides included family photos, charts, and images of documents. I also put speaking points on the slides to help the audience follow along since my story tended to bounce around from time period to time period. I even did a review after speaking about Paubla Torres' ancestors since many of the names were similiar.

Powerpoint presentation



About 50 people attended the presentation. Half were either descendants of Samuel and Paubla (Torres) Zimmerly, or their significant others. After my presentation, I took questions from the audience, in which we discussed such topics as where Samuel Zimmerly was born. I argued that he was born in Switzerland, while others took the traditional family view that he was born in Germany.


Audience, Botts Hall, 19 July 2008



During the program, I displayed and referenced certain documents. These included Civil War soldier and widow pension records for Samuel and Paubla, Regimental Descriptive Book and Muster Roll for Samuel Zimmerly, a copy of a history of the Zimmerly Family that was published in the El Defensor Chieftain (Socorro, New Mexico newspaper) in 1966, marriage records for all of the Sam and Paubla's children, and other documents.

After completing my presentation, I donated these documents to the Albuquerque Special Collections Library. They will be placed in a file for anyone to access. I only ask that you make copies of these documents rather than taking them from the library. This allows for others to access them later. To find the Zimmerly file, please ask the librarian to show you where the family surname files are located.

Please check with the library before visiting, as it has limited hours of operation. Click on this link for more information about the library.



Zimmerly documents on display



I dedicate my speech to my second cousin, Michael Chavez. On Friday, he collapsed unexpectedly while attending a function. On Saturday, July 19, 2008, he passed away. My family found out that he was in the hospital while I was finishing up my presentation.

19 July 2008

NMGS Volunteer Receives Grant to Complete Project

Karen Stein Daniel, CGSM, just informed us that she has been awarded a $500 individual grant from the Historical Society of New Mexico to assist in completing the third volume of Naturalization Records by New Mexico Courts, Volume III. The grant will help her complete the project by giving her the money to work on the docket books for Bernalillo County which are housed at the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives in Santa Fe. She expects to complete the project in less than two years. She was advised of this grant by Dr. David L. Caffey of HSNM.

Karen is a certified genealogist who has volunteered for NMGS for years. She is a prolific researcher and author who has published many books and articles with the New Mexico Genealogical Society.

14 July 2008

Spanish Land Grant Files Online!

The collection "Thomas B. Catron Papers, 1692-1932" has records on nearly 300 land claims, from the period of 1891-1903. The papers are at the Center for Southwest Research, at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. The entire collection can also be found on microfilm at the Albuquerque Special Collections Library. That's great. But what if you can't get to Albuquerque to check those records?

You can view images of some of those records online.

If you go the Online Archive of New Mexico or the Rocky Mountain Online Archive, and search for the "Thomas B. Catron Papers", you will discover the finding aid for that collection. If you scroll down teh finding aid to "Digital Collections", you'll find the following files online:

(Click on the links below to access the files.)

Cañon de Chama (Case No. 107)

Cañon del Rio de Chama (Case No. 218)

Cieneguilla (Case Nos. 84 and 214)

Cuyamungue (Case No. 112)

Juan de Ulibarri (Case No. 253)

La Majada (Case No. 89 and miscellany in Series 303, 305 and 310)

Los Cerrillos (Case No. 78)

Petaca (Case Nos. 99 and 153)

San Antonio de las Huertas (Case Nos. 90, 269 and miscellany in Series 306)

San Joaquin del Nacimento (Case Nos. 203 and 213)

San Marcos (Case No. 22)

San Miguel del Bado (Case Nos. 25, 60, 198 and miscellany in Series 306)

Santa Cruz (Case Nos. 181, 194 and miscellany in Series 306)

Santo Domingo de Cundiyo (Case No. 211)

Sitio de los Cerrillos (Case No. 79)

Town of Real de Dolores (Case No. 111)

Here is the link to the finding aid itself.

You may be wondering how I found this link. Simple, I found it in the book "Genealogical Resources in New Mexico: Third Edition", page 65. This is just one of many things you can find in this research guide. Don't you wish you had a copy of this book? Well, it's easy enough to purchase.

You can order a copy of "Genealogical Resources in New Mexico: Third Edition" by going to the NMGS Press page of the NMGS Website. Here is the link. It is near the bottom of the page, book # E-5. It is only $7.50 for NMGS members, $15.00 for non-members. Click on the Order Form at the bottom of the page, print and complete the form and send it with payment to NMGS.

Link: description of "Genealogical Resources of New Mexico: Third Edition."

13 July 2008

Call for Papers: Western History Association

Pat Esterly sent me this notice:

The Western History Association will hold its 2009 conference in Denver, CO. Coordinators are now accepting proposals for conference presentations, performances, workshops and moderated discussions. Information about the 2009 conference is available at: http://www.umsl.edu/~wha/conf/2009/index.html

The Call for Papers link is at: http://www.umsl.edu/~wha/conf/2009/WIRED_WEST_finalcall.pdf

09 July 2008

DAR Lookup

This was previously posted in RootsWeb Review: 9 July 2008, Vol. 11, No. 17

Think you might have an ancestor who served in the American Revolutionary War (1775-83)? Would you like to know whether your ancestor is listed with the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) in the "Patriot Index?" A helpful group of organized DAR volunteers monitor the RootsWeb DAR Message Board every day and welcome lookup requests. Include your Revolutionary War-era ancestor's first and last name, spouse's name (if known), dates of birth and death, and state of residence. You need not be interested in joining the NSDAR to request a lookup.

Click here to request your search.

03 July 2008

July 2008 NMGS Program

Saturday, July 19, 2008, 10:30 AM
Botts Hall, Albuquerque Special Collections Library
423 Edith NE, Albuquerque NM (NW Corner of Edith and Central)

Robert J. C. Baca
President of the New Mexico Genealogical Society,
presents

Swiss Family Zimmerly:
A Socorro, New Mexico Story


Samuel and Maria Paubla (Torres) Zimmerly

It is the story of the merging of two cultures. He was a foreign-born American Civil War soldier; she was a daughter of a family as old as New Mexico itself. Together they created a unique Swiss/Hispano family. Their story begins in the early frontier days of Socorro, goes through the advent of statehood, and continues on to the present day.

Robert Baca, a former resident of Socorro, NM, is a descendant of Samuel and Maria Paubla (Torres) Zimmerly, progenitors of the New Mexico Zimmerly family. In his presentation, he will display family photos and documents, and will include a short discussion on the research methods that he used to create this story.

Certain books published by NMGS on Socorro, New Mexico records will be on sale at the presentation. Please visit the NMGS Press web page at http://www.nmgs.org/books.htm for a full listing of NMGS books.

This program is free and open to the public.

For more information about our programs, please visit our website at http://www.nmgs.org/workshop.htm.

NARA Electronic Records Archive Project

This link was sent to the NMGS Board by NMGS member Karen Daniel. I thought I would share it with you.

From the National Coalition for History Blog:

NARA Announces Roll Out of Electronic Records Archive Project

On June 27, 2008, Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein announced the launch of the initial phase of the Electronic Records Archives (ERA) Project.....

In July, the National Archives will start moving approximately three and a half million computer files into ERA. The records eventually will be accessible online in ERA.

Four federal agencies (the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, the National Oceanographic Office, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics) have been testing the system and are scheduled to start using ERA in September....
For more information about this program, check out this link.

02 July 2008

New Digitized Collections: UNM

The following was sent to me by Nancy Anderson:

News from the University of New Mexico Libraries

New Digitized Collections

University Archives Adds Digital Collections
(http://e2ma.net/go/1170466557/1062883/38798430/goto:http://econtent.unm.edu/cdm4/index_UNMArchives.php)
Almost 600 historical photographs of campus buildings, landscapes, and interiors were recently added to the UNM University Archives digital collections. The photographs, ranging in date from the turn of the century through the 1980s, are available online at the University Archives website. An additional 60 photos documenting Lobo sports teams - including the 1901 Lobo Women's Basketball Team and 1933 Women's Tennis Team - have also been added to the University Archives
(http://e2ma.net/go/1170466557/1062883/38798430/goto:http://econtent.unm.edu/cdm4/index_UNMArchives.php)'

Jos Guadalupe Posada Collection of Mexican Popular Prints
(http://e2ma.net/go/1170466557/1062883/38798434/goto:http://econtent.unm.edu/cdm4/index_PictorialCollection.php)
The online collection includes lithographs, etchings, and engravings by Posada from three different collections in the Center for Southwest Research. Subjects range from humorous to didactic, romantic to religious and political. Posada's signature calaveras are represented, as are sensational crime stories, supernatural subjects and popular songs. This project was made possible with funding from the Center for Regional Studies.

29 June 2008

June / July, 2008 NMGS eNewsletter

June/July 2008 NMGS eNewsletter



Table of Contents


1. President’s Message
2. Upcoming Programs
3. NMGS Blog
4. NMGS Website
5. Albuquerque Special Collections Library
6. NMGS Press



1. President’s Message

Greetings:

Because of my busy schedule, I was unable to send a NMGS eNewsletter at the beginning of June. Therefore, this issue is for two months: June and July.

We had to make a change to the July 2008 program. The program next month will be the “Swiss Family Zimmerly: A Socorro, New Mexico Story”. Yours truly will be the speaker. I hope to see you on July 19th at the Albuquerque Special Collections Library.

Sincerely,

Robert Baca, President NMGS

2. Upcoming Programs


* Saturday July 19, 2008, 10:30 AM, Special Collections Library, 423 Central Ave. NE, Albuquerque, NM (NW corner of Edith and Central.)

“Swiss Family Zimmerly: A Socorro, New Mexico Story” – speaker: Robert J. C. Baca. It is the story of the merging of two cultures. He was a foreign-born American Civil War soldier; she was a daughter of a family as old as New Mexico itself. Together they created a unique Swiss/Hispano family. Their story begins in the early frontier days of Socorro, goes through the advent of statehood, and continues on to the present day. The presenter will include a discussion of the research methods that he used to create this story.

* Saturday August 16, 2008, 10:30 AM, Special Collections Library, 423 Central Ave. NE, Albuquerque, NM (NW corner of Edith and Central.)

Workshop: “Researching at the Courthouse: Deeds, Wills, Titles and Other Records – Part II” – Presenter: William Litchman. Mr. Litchman presents the second part of his workshop that he began in September 2007. It will be an in-depth exploration of legal records that are essential to genealogical research.


* Coming in September: A traveling program to Las Vegas, New Mexico. Find out more about this program next month!

All programs are open and free to the public. For more information about these programs, please visit our website at http://www.nmgs.org/workshop.htm.

3. NMGS Blog

* Are the kids driving you crazy this summer? Why not get them involved in fun genealogical activities? The post “Summertime Blues: Genealogy Activities for Kids” has a listing of some great sites for kids. Check out the link at http://nmgsblog.blogspot.com/2008/06/summertime-blues-genealogy-activities.html


* In June, NMGS went on a field trip to Bernalillo, NM. Find out how it went by visiting the post “Field Trip to the Sandoval County Historical Society” at http://nmgsblog.blogspot.com/2008/06/field-trip-to-sandoval-county.html

Get up to date information about programs and events, genealogical news, and links to interesting websites by subscribing to the New Mexico Genealogical Society Blog at http://nmgsblog.blogspot.com/


4. NMGS Website

Did you know that you can help out Albuquerque Special Collections Library by ordering books on Amazon.com? Go to the front page of the NMGS website at http://www.nmgs.org/ and click on “Amazon.com” link on the left hand side of the page. Order books, electronics and other items from this link and a portion of your purchases will go to NMGS to support the Albuquerque Special Collections Library.


5. Albuquerque Special Collections Library


This is an exhibit you don't want to miss -- A treat for everyone living in or near Albuquerque, or planning a trip here!

Three Hundred Years of Albuquerque History

On exhibit through Sept. 6, 2008

at Special Collections Library.


This special exhibit includes all of the books about Albuquerque published during the Tricentennial, featuring the newly-published genealogy of Alburquerque's founding families, "Aqui Se Comienza" by the New Mexico Genealogical Society. Also on display are documents and illustrations about early Albuquerque, loaned to Special Collections library by the Center for Southwest Research of the University of New Mexico. This is a large compilation of images and documents about life in Albuquerque from its founding in 1706 up to modern times."


For more information, check out the library’s website at http://www.cabq.gov/library/specol.html

6. NMGS Press

Below are some books that relate to Socorro, New Mexico that are sold by NMGS Press:

* San Miguel del Socorro Church (Baptisms), 1821 – 1853. 500 pages, 1998. Book A-9. $50.00.

* Censuses of 1833 and 1845 - Socorro & Surrounding Communities of the Rio Abajo. 172 pages, 1994. Book B-6. $24.00.

You can order these books and many, many more on the NMGS Press webpage at http://www.nmgs.org/books.htm

23 June 2008

Summertime Blues: Genealogy Activities for Kids

Ah, it's summertime! The kids are home all day and they're bored. Or you're putting together a family reunion and you realize that - oh my gosh! - there's going to be children at the event! What to do, what to do?

Well, your uncle Bob has been searching the Internet, and has found a few activities that kids can do to have family history fun! (Yes, Virginia, you can have fun with genealogy!)

* NewEnglandAncestors.org has a list of activities that you and your kids can participate in. You can do these activities at home, or while taking a family vacation or field trip. Link.


* Ah, what's more exciting than the U.S. Census Bureau? I know that I love to go through pages and pages of census records finding my ancestor's records. However, children do tend to have less of an interest in research and much shorter attention spans. That's why the census bureau created a Fact Finder Kid's Corner web page. On this site, kids can learn about the U.S. Census, get facts about their state, and have fun with quiz questions. Link.


* Is your child going through a "goth" period? Or does your kid just like to gross you out with random disease factoids? Well, Rootsweb has a website for your kid: "Epidemic's of the Past". On this page, kids can find out how disease ravaged the United States and the World. The page includes links about the history of disease. What fun! Link.

* Have the kids interview their relatives. USGenWeb has a "Tips for Interviewing" web page. Now the kids have all the appropriate questions that the can ask grandma, instead of all those embarrasing ones that they usually ask. Link.

Here are a few more sites for kids:


* Family Tree Magazine's Fun for the Whole Family



... and, last but not least, Cyndi List - Kid's and Teens
In case you're wondering, the little girl in the photo above is my grandmother Paublita (Zimmerly) Baca. It was taken c. 1912.

22 June 2008

Field Trip to the Sandoval County Historical Society

On Saturday, June 21, 2008, NMGS visited the Sandoval County Historical Society in Bernalillo, NM. This was the second time this year that we've traveled to another organization's site to have a meeting.

Our featured speaker was Bertille Baca, long-time resident of Pena Blanca, NM. She began her speech by giving us a history of the Baca family going back to Spain. She then discussed her own genealogy going back to Luis Maria Cabeza de Baca, a settler of the Las Vegas, NM area in the late 1700s. He and his large family of over 20 children later settled in Pena Blanca.

Bertille told stories of her youth in the 1930s and 40s. They were funny and entertaining. She offered audience members the chance to make copies of her handwritten stories. Members of the audience encouraged her to publish her stories so that future generations may enjoy.



* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

There were about 30 people who attended the meeting in Bernalillo on Saturday. About half were NMGS members, while the others were from SCHS. After Bertille's speech, Martha Liebert talked about other families of Sandoval County. She introduced a number of people in the audience who were descendants of prominent county families and encouraged all of us to talk to them about their families.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Sandoval County Historical Society holds their meetings in the DeLavy house in Bernalillo, NM. This museum/library houses hundreds of books, and contains a large photo archive. Many of the rooms are covered with poster boards that show the history of the county and the families that lived there. It is very impressive. One could spend days just looking at the boards themselves.

The DeLavy House is at 151 Edmund Rd., Bernalillo, NM. Follow this link, and click on "How to Find Us" to get detailed directions.

SCHS holds monthly meetings, except usually during the summer. These meetings include lectures, dramatizations and field trips. The next meeting will be on Sunday, July 13, 2008 at 2 PM, at which Benny Goodman's famous 1938 Carnegie Hall concert will be played on CD.

For more information about SCHS, check out their website at this link.

18 May 2008

Free Military Records at Ancestry.com, May 20-31, 2008

As they have done in previous years, Ancestry.com is allowing the public to view their military records for free between May 20 - 31, 2008. This is in commemoration of Memorial Day. If you are interested in viewing these databases, follow this link.

Footnote.com on Trial Basis at Special Collections Library

It was announced at the May NMGS Meeting that the Albuquerque Special Collections Library has a free trial subscription to Footnote.com. This website includes images of historical documents from the National Archives, including military records. The trial subscription is only for 3o days and may only be accessed at the Special Collections Library.

The librarians wish us to review this website and tell them what we think about it. If they receive enough positive response they will purchase an annual subscription to the database. Therefore, if you have the opportunity, please go visit the library and review the website.

In order to access the database, you must purchase a $3 smart card from the library. This card not only allow you to access this website, but other websites such as Ancestry.com Library Edition and Heritage Quest Online. You may also use this card to access the Internet at other Rio Grande Library System libraries; however, you can only find the genealogy databases for free at the Special Collection Library.

The Albuquerque Special Collections Library is at 423 Central Ave. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87102. Their phone number is (505) 848-1376. Their website is http://www.cabq.gov/library/specol.html, and you may contact them by e-mail at SpecialCollections@cabq.gov.

For more information about Footnote.com, visit their website at this link.

What You Missed at Yesterday's NMGS Program

Over 30 people attended the New Mexico Genealogical Society's May 17th workshop "How to Do Research at the Special Collections Library." The workshop took place at the Albuquerque Special Collections Library. Attendees include people just beginning their research to seasoned researchers who have hit brick walls and cannot find further information about their ancestors.

Nancy Anderson, Jeannette Gallegos and I served as workshop facilitators. We broke up into three groups. The groups searched computer and Internet databases, looked at books and microfilm, and took a tour of the library. Newcomers also took a short workshop on how to begin genealogical research. The workshop ended around 1 PM; however, many people continued doing research long afterwards. Library staff and volunteers helped them with their research.

We hope to do similar workshops in the future. If you have any ideas for workshops or programs, please send me an e-mail at abqbocat@nmia.com or post a comment to this blog.

June 2008 NMGS Traveling Program

Saturday, June 21, 2008, 10:30 A.M.

Traveling Program
at the DeLavy House
151 Edmond Rd., Bernalillo, New Mexico

NMGS Visits
The Sandoval County Historical Society

Featured Speaker: Martha Liebert

Additional Speakers
Bertile Baca: “The Baca Family of Peña Blanca”; and,
Debbie Montoya: “The Montoya Family of Peña Blanca”

Come join us in Bernalillo, New Mexico as we go visit the Sandoval County Historical Society.View a special photo display about the families from Peña Blanca.

Directions to the DeLavy House

The DeLavy House is located in Bernalillo, New Mexico, on the north side of US 550. It lies west of the Rio Grande between the Santa Ana Star Casino on the west and the road to Coronado State Monument on the east. The physical address is 151 Edmond Road, Bernalillo, New Mexico 87004.

A map to the museum may be found at the Sandoval County Historical Society website: http://www.sandovalhistory.org/.

14 May 2008

Job posting

Help Wanted: Genealogist - $82,961.00 to $107,854.00 Per Year

The Department of the Interior is looking for a professional genealogist to work full-time researching Indian ancestry. The position is in Washington, D.C. The salary will range from $82,961.00 to 107,854.00 per year, depending on experience and qualifications.

From Richard Eastman's Online Genealogy Journal.
Read the full article: http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2008/05/help-wanted-gen.html


10 May 2008

2008 Summer Class at UNM: Acequias y Mercedes

The University of New Mexico is presenting a Summer 2008 class called

"Acequias y Mercedes: Land, Water & Cultural Landscapes of New Mexico"

to be held on June 2 - 27, 2008, 9-12, Monday through Friday.

Weeks 1,2 & 4 will be at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM; while week 3 will be held in the Mora Valley, NM.

From the flier:

"Field Seminars: A field based survey of Acequia Culture and Landscapes of New Mexico, based on the folkways associated with traditional management of water, historic land grants, and agriculture. This overview of ecology, history, ethnography, and sustainable systems of the region is accompanied by training in digital documentary technology, interview techniques, field notes, archiving, analysis, and the ethics of cultural representation. Two weeks of fieldwork will be conducted in the middle Rio Grande Valley, Tijeras Canyon, and Cuba, plus one week in the Mora Valley of northern NM."

For more information, contact Dr. Enrique Lamadrid at (505) 269-5569, or by E-mail: lamadrid@unm.edu.

06 May 2008

May 2008 NMGS Newsletter



New Mexico Genealogical Society
May 2008 Newsletter

Table of Contents



1. President’s Message
2. Upcoming Programs
3. NMGS Blog
4. NMGS Receives Lansing B. Bloom Award
5. NMGS Website
6. NMGS Press


1. President’s Message

This month’s program is an interactive workshop “How to Do Research at the Special Collections Library.” The workshop will be facilitated by a panel of NMGS genealogists.

NMGS received another award, the Historical Society of New Mexico’s Lansing B. Bloom Award. This is the second time that our organization has won this award.

For up to date information, check out our website at http://www.nmgs.org or our blog at http://nmgsblog.blogspot.com.

Robert Baca, President NMGS

2. Upcoming Programs

* Saturday May 17, 2008, 10:30 AM, Special Collections Library, 423 Central Ave. NE, Albuquerque, NM (NW corner of Edith and Central.)
An Interactive Workshop: “How to Do Research at the Special Collections Library”. Facilitated by a panel of NMGS genealogists - Books, microfilms, and computers: the Albuquerque Special Collections Library has much to offer. Learn how to do research at one of the best genealogy libraries in New Mexico. Experienced genealogists are encouraged to share their knowledge with the class.

* Saturday June 21, 2008, 10:30 AM, The DeLavy House, 151 Edmond Rd. , Bernalillo, NM (The DeLavy House is located in Bernalillo, New Mexico, on the north side of US 550. It lies west of the Rio Grande between the Santa Ana Star Casino on the west and the road to Coronado State Monument on the east.)

Traveling Program: “NMGS Visits the Sandoval County Historical Society” – Featured Speaker: Martha Liebert.. Other speakers include Bertile Baca who will discuss the “Baca Family of Peña Blanca”, and Debbie Montoya who will talk about “The Montoya Family of Peña Blanca”. Also, view a special photo display about the families of that area.

* Coming in July: Gloria Valencia y Valdez speaks about “Other Possible Founders of Alburquerque”!

All programs are open and free to the public. For more information about these programs, please visit our website at http://www.nmgs.org/workshop.htm.

3. NMGS Blog

As announced last month, the New Mexico Genealogical Society launched a new blog! Visit the blog at http://nmgsblog.blogspot.com to find news and information of interest to you.

Recently, we posted an article with photos about the April NMGS program, Jan Bennett’s “The Making of a Family: The Pecos Years 1916-1940.” Take a look at what you missed:
<http://nmgsblog.blogspot.com/2008/04/local-family-historian-speaks-at-april.html>.

We want to serve the entire New Mexico genealogical community. Therefore, if you know about an event, news or a website link that we should know about, please send me an E-mail at abqbobcat@nmia.com. – Robert Baca.

4. NMGS Receives Lansing B. Bloom Award

The New Mexico Genealogical Society received the Lansing B. Bloom Award on Saturday, April 25, 2008, at the annual conference of the Historical Society of New Mexico in Deming, NM. The historical society presents this award each year “for an outstanding publication by a society or organization.”

The specific publication that won the award is Aquí Se Comienza: A Genealogical History of the Founding Families of La Villa de San Felipe de Alburquerque. This book, published in 2007, contains genealogies of certain Spanish families that settled Albuquerque in 1706. It was published in commemoration of the Albuquerque Tricentennial celebration.

The book’s project director Gloria Valencia y Valdez accepted the award for the New Mexico Genealogical Society. This is the second award that the book has received; it was also honored with the 2007 New Mexico Book Award: Book on a Hispanic Subject.

For more information, please visit the Historical Society of New Mexico website: http://www.hsnm.org/

5. NMGS Website

Here are a few pages that you can find on the NMGS website:

A Cuarto Centennial History of New Mexico
http://www.nmgs.org/artcuarto.htm.

Locating Catholic Church Records in New Mexico
http://www.nmgs.org/Chrchs-intro.htm

Projects: New and Ongoing
http://www.nmgs.org/Projects.htm

6. NMGS Press

This month’s featured books:

* San Agustin de la Isleta Church Marriage and Baptisms. Marriages 1726 to 1846; Baptisms 1730 to 1776 and 1829 to 1842. Book C-4. $40.00.

* Church of San Antonio de Sandia 1771 – 1864. Book C-1. $15.00.

* Church in San Juan Pueblo 1726 – 1776, 1831-1855; and Church in Santa Clara Pueblo1726-1832. Book C-8. $25.00.

You can order these books and many, many more on the NMGS Press webpage at http://www.nmgs.org/books.htm

Controversy Over Catholic Church Records

Many of you use Catholic Church records in your research; therefore, the following article may be of concern to you. A Vatican council recently directed Catholic churches not to allow the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints to microfilm or digitally record the Church's sacramental records. The Vatican's concern is that the LDS Church may use these records to posthumously baptize Catholic parishioners.

Click on the following links for further information:

* About.com article

* Catholic News Service article

03 May 2008

May 17, 2008 NMGS Program

Saturday, May 17, 2008, 10:30 AM

Botts Hall, Albuquerque Special Collections Library
423 Edith NE, Albuquerque NM (NW Corner of Edith and Central)

An interactive workshop

“How to Do Research at the Special Collections Library”

Facilitated by a panel of NMGS genealogists

Books, microfilms, and computers: the Albuquerque Special Collections Library has much to offer. Learn how to do research at one of the best genealogy libraries in New Mexico.

Experienced genealogists are encouraged to share their knowledge with the class.

This program is free and open to the public.

For more information about our programs, please visit our website at http://www.nmgs.org/workshop.htm.

30 April 2008

Doña Eufemia Award

Commemorating the first recorded Thanksgiving held on North American soil, the New Mexican Hispanic Culture Preservation League held a formal banquet on April 19th. Patricia Baca Black Esterly (NMGS web editor) was presented the 2008 Doña Eufemia Award. She received a beautiful retablo of Santiago de Campostela handcrafted by Marie Antoinette Luna.

Retablo

National History Day winners

National History Day: The New Mexico state finals of National History Day were held Friday, April 25th at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque. Students competed for two prizes at $100.00 each awarded by NMGS member Dr. Thomas G. Munyon and two at $100.00 each by the New Mexico Genealogical Society. The theme for 2008 was "Conflict and Compromise." See 2008 winners in a full report by Karen S. Daniel CGsm.

28 April 2008

NMGS Receives Lansing B. Bloom Award

Click on the image above to get a larger view.

We are proud to announce that the New Mexico Genealogical Society received the Lansing B. Bloom Award on April 25, 2008. This award was presented by the Historical Society of New Mexico "for an outstanding publication by a society or institution." The award was for the 2007 book "Aqui Se Comienza: A Genealogical History of the Founding Families of La Villa de San Felipe de Alburquerque".

The book's primary editor, Gloria M. Valencia y Valdez, accepted the award for the society. NMGS Congratulates Gloria and all of the book's contributors.

Click this link to purchase your copy of "Aqui Se Comienza". ($55.00, softbound. Book # E-13.)

26 April 2008

Update on NM genealogy sources

The New Mexico Death Index Project is still available, but is now at: http://www.usgwarchives.org/nm/deaths.htm.

La Cronica, the Journal of the Historical Society of New Mexico, has been indexed. To search for articles and authors, go to HSNM Programs>Publications>La Cronica.

24 April 2008

Naming Contest for Santa Fe Facility

This notice was once again sent to me by Nancy Brown-Martinez of UNM:

The City of Santa Fe is seeking our input. Submit your recommendation for the name of the new city facility. The convention, conference, civic and cultural facility is scheduled to open the fall of 2008.

Email your submission to: namethecenter@santafe.org or mail your submission to:

Name the Center
c/o Santa Fe CVB
60 E San Francisco St Ste 312
Santa Fe, NM 87501

Each submission must be accompanied by a justification as to why the name should be adopted (limit 100 words).

All submissions must be received by 5:00 PM, Friday, May 2nd, 2008.

Book Signing at UNM Bookstore

From Nancy Brown-Martinez of UNM:

Felipe Gonzales, Professor of Sociology and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, will sign copies of his edited volume, "Expressing New Mexico: Nuevomexicano Creativity, Ritual, and Memory", this Saturday, April 26, 2008, at 2:00 PM at the University of New Mexico Bookstore.

The book contains essays by many distinguished UNM faculty, such as Enrique La Madrid, Gabriel Melendez, Diana Rebolledo, and Sylvia Rodriguez. All are invited to come.

The University of New Mexico is in Albuquerque, NM. The bookstore is located at 2301 Central Ave. NE, on the NW corner of Cornell and Central Ave., across from the Frontier Restaurant.

23 April 2008

RootsWeb used for Identity Theft

April 18, 2008

California Woman Uses RootsWeb to Commit Identity Theft

Federal prosecutors this week charged a Southern California woman with aggravated identity theft and other crimes for allegedly using a popular genealogy research website to locate people who had recently died, and then taking over their credit cards.

Tracy June Kirkland, 42, allegedly used Rootsweb.com to find the names, Social Security numbers and birth dates of people who, shall we say, had no further need for their consumer credit lines. She then "would randomly call various credit card companies to determine if the deceased individual had an … account," according to the 15-count indictment filed in federal court in Los Angeles Tuesday.

She'd then persuade the issuer to change the mailing address for the dead victim to one of her many rented mail drops in Orange and Riverside counties, and in some cases she'd add her own name as an authorized user of the card, prosecutors say.

You can read the entire story in the Wired web site at http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/04/feds-charge-cal.html. The indictment is available at http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/files/tracy_june_kirkland.pdf.

My thanks to John Ralls for letting me know about this story.

20 April 2008

NM State Finals: National History Day - April 25, 2008

Our own Karen Daniel will be one of the judges at the New Mexico State Finals of the National History Day Competition on April 25, 2008. The event will take place at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is open to the public. Exhibits will be displayed beginning at 8 AM; awards will be presented at 4 PM.

National History Day is a year-long educational program that engages students in grades 6-12 in the process of discovery and interpretation of historical topics. Students produce dramatic performances, individual and group exhibits, multimedia documentaries, and research papers based on research related to an annual theme. These projects are then evaluated at local, state, and national competitions. This year's topic is "Conflict and Compromise in History."

The New Mexico Genealogical Society is sponsoring four $100 Awards for this competition. Last year, we sponsored only two awards. The two additional awards were donated by NMGS member, Dr. Thomas G. Munyon.

For more information, follow these links:

* National History Day

* State Finals of the National History Day Competition

* National Hispanic Cultural Center

Historical Society of New Mexico Annual Conference: April 24-26, 2008

The Historical Society of New Mexico will be holding its Annual Conference on April 24 - 26, 2008 in Deming, New Mexico. As mentioned before on this blog, the New Mexico Genealogical Society is schedule to receive the Lansing B. Bloom Award at the the conference for our publication Aqui Se Comienza.

For more information about this conference, please check on the following link.

Local Family Historian Speaks at April NMGS Meeting

Her family loved to diary and write letters. Today, when all we have are text messaging, e-mails and, yes, even blogs, it's nice to look back to a time when writing was a true craft, and even children could be craftsmen. Jan Bennett displays her family's writings in her book "The Making of a Family: The Pecos years 1916-1940." On April 19, 2008, she presented her book to the New Mexico Genealogical Society, and discussed with the group the process of writing and publishing a family history.


Click on the photos below to see larger views




Mrs. Bennett read excerpts from her book to the audience at Botts Hall, in the Albuquerque Special Collections Library. She and her cousin, Penny Storms, published the book independently in September, 2007. The text includes beautiful, vivid family stories written by Bennett and Storms, as well as original stories and diary entries written by their fathers. Their fathers, Robert and Daniel MacPherson, were encouraged by their own mother to write frequently in their journals, especially when they went on vacation.

The MacPhersons lived in Albuquerque, but every summer the family would vacation at their cabin in Pecos, New Mexico. The brothers, Robert and Danny, would fish, hike and ride horses all summer long. To the delight of the audience, Bennett read aloud excerpts from the brothers' writings which described their adventures in Pecos.

In addition to reading from the book, Bennett also discussed her writing process. She told the audience how she came upon a number of diaries and letters that her family wrote. In order to save these writing for posterity, she and her cousin decided to write this book. She knew her grandparents, and realized that her children and grandchildren needed to know them, too. How better to tell her grandparents' story than through the words of her father and uncle?

She was not able to find a publisher who wanted to publish her book. Luckily, her cousin Penny Storms had been in the publishing business for eleven years. Together, they published the book independently.

Many attendees of the lecture purchased Bennet's book, and she signed copies before leaving. You may find her book at the Page One Bookstore in Albuquerque, New Mexico.


The family always waited anxiously for the mail to arrive. Jan displays a mail bag that they used. The writing on the bag reads "D.A. MacPherson; Holy Ghost Canyon; Espirito Santo Canyon; Valley Ranch, N.M."


Jan shows the audience a photocopy of a family diary. The books on the table include diaries, letters, and the original manuscript of her book.


Some of her family's diaries.



Robert MacPherson's drawing of the family's flight to Pensacola, Florida. A figure on the bottom right says "Adios, Folks"; while the figure on the left displays the Florida shore. Robert was apparently very detailed in his drawings: the airplane on top includes its call letters!

Biography:
Jan Bennett has lived in Albuquerque her whole life. She is a retired Spanish teacher from APS. She is married, and has two grown children. She is a photojournalist and a fine art photographer. She will be a featured artists at the Placitas Artist Series on May 25, 2008 in Placitas, New Mexico.